Hospitality Design

Current Trends to Keep In Mind When Updating Your Website

Trends are ever evolving and in order to stay current, we must evolve with them. Technology is something we can not predict, but we can learn to understand it. There are tons of website hosts that can provide templates for your site and make it a quick and easy fix, but really dialing in and customizing your user’s experience will not go unnoticed. There are many ways to attract the eye of your visitors, so we’ve put together a few tips to keep in mind for your next website update.

·       Your website should be professionally designed, interactive, engaging, mobile friendly and easy to navigate. Try to avoid the traditional clogged up pages by minimizing your page design to keep every detail in proportion. Take note the use of white space and less use of icons or images. One of the strongest site designs has been Parallax. The all scrolling function is a versatile mechanic for seamless delivery of content on your site. It works well with images and video based content where large hi-res visuals play and pause as the user scrolls. Keeping your content at the scroll of a finger keeps users engaged and able to quickly find the information they are looking for.

·       Site Navigation is the pulse of website strategy. Organize your pages with strong terms and categorize them appropriately on your page’s menu. Users must know what they are looking for and shouldn’t have to play the guessing game on where to go. Your site should be a quick and easy click.

·       Always use approachable text. No one wants to read something that sounds like a term paper. You want your wording to be informative, not too salesy, so that your website can play as the start to your conversation with potential leads. Using words or phrases that your visitors may not recognize can definitely turn them away. Information on your site should be written as though you’re speaking directly to the visitor, so use terms like “you” and “we.” An informal tone is better than stiff, corporate.

·       Provide relevant information. When users search the web, they’re seeking answers. Visitors want honest and transparent information that will help them make an educated decision. If your site doesn’t provide the facts, the visitor will move on to the next one. Studies show information-rich websites are the most effective in converting visitors into serious leads.

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Top Customer-Inspired Hotel Marketing Trends

Marketing begins with empathy. We have many years of experience in digital marketing, but we have many more years of experience traveling, checking into hotels, and researching the best deals for the best prices. As owners, designers, and marketers of hotels, we sometimes become immune to the client experience. We are so influenced by the internal point of view that it can be hard to understand exactly how our customers think and feel. Before setting your hotel marketing plan, you need to walk through the experience of checking into your hotel to truly understand how guests arrive at your door. Hospitality is, after all, all about the client.

Google Business:

Whenever you find yourself in a foreign city looking for any service, you likely turn to Google for advice. The hotel industry is no different. Google: “Hotels in [your city].” Does your hotel come up? Google prioritizes companies with Google business, so if you do not have it, a HUGE number of potential clients will never find you. While travelers might not rely entirely on Google results, it is often one of the first places they check because it provides all the necessary logistics required to start narrowing down decisions. For hotels, this includes prices, a city map, ratings, and amenities. Start by making sure your Google Business account is set up. The more information you provide, the more likely it is that Google will display your company. Lastly, add plenty of professional photos to help travelers make decisions.

Mobile Booking Opportunities:

Mobile users are everywhere. More and more often, travelers are using their cell phones to book last minute reservations. Make sure your website is mobile-friendly and guests have the ability to book instantly. This includes displayed prices in a way that makes decisions easy and fast.

Facebook Ads:

78% of all Americans have Facebook. Each of those people check their Facebook page around3-5 times per day. Facebook is a very convenient way to advertise your hotel because it allows you to target your ideal guests directly. Choose business travelers or families with small children. You can even select the approximate salary of the people who will see your advertisement. Make sure you use an image that clearly displays a guest room and the price. Include amenities such as “free Wifi.” Then, all you have to do is select a budget. Facebook tracks all metrics and tells you exactly how many people saw the ad as well as how many clicked on it. Easy, but effective.

Google Ads:

Google ads is another great way to advertise. It allows you to automatically appear in the top search results for desired keywords. Make sure to spend some time researching your keywords. Then select the region for display. With Google, you only pay for clicks, so you have a great ROI.

Virtual Tours:

If you have a beautiful hotel or location, show it off! What’s more convincing than a virtual tour? With the rise of virtual reality, it is now easier than ever to create an immersive web experience. In the past, it was a complicated process to weave images together. Now, most of us can take 360-degree images with our phones. Choose some of the most striking views of your hotel, like  your lobby, a conference space, or a suite, and set your phone to 360 mode and rotate slowly and steadily. If you have beautiful scenery outside, you can capture an incredible photo of the sunset with a 360 image.

Ask for Reviews:

New guests rely on the testimony of others. How will anyone know you have the best hotel in the city if no one helps spread the word. Make sure reviews are easy to find on your website so that when guests want to compliment your services, they know where to go. If someone shares their great experience with you personally, inquire where they heard of your hotel. If the answer is an online source, politely ask for reviews about their great experience. Google and TripAdvisor are some of the top referring sites, but they are heavily reliant on reviews. You might even offer discount codes or other incentives for customers that take the time to write a review.

Understanding your customers comes from asking questions and listening. In a competitive industry, the only way to stay ahead is by keeping up with your customer’s needs. Email us at: hello@adesignpartnership.com to find out more about target marketing.  

Commercial Design vs. Residential Design

We’ve seen the trend in interior design where the segmentation between commercial design and residential design is fading. Clients are asking for home offices with a corporate feel, and kitchens modeled after restaurants, and there is a huge demand for boutique hotel bedrooms and in-home spas as bathrooms. In contemporary design, commercial furniture, materials, lighting, and fixtures are used to replicate luxurious commercial environments. Consumer interest in commercial-inspired design has reached such a high that, as an example, the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas opened a home furnishings store.

This is not a one-way street. Residential elements are also creeping into an increasing number of commercial designs as clients ask for their commercial spaces to “feel more like home.” The natural melting of the live-work-play community is growing as more people want to live closer to their workplace or, in some cases, in the same building. New studies about productivity and innovation have prompted employers to offer employees a more comfortable and personalized workspace.

We have lived so long by the distinctions of the two “types” of design, that at times, a transition into something more ambiguous is overwhelming.

Residential Design:

The first misconception about residential design is its simplicity. First, residential design begins as a partnership between the architect and interior designer making sure that the home is safe and structurally sound. A designer who primarily works in homes will sometimes specialize in a particular area such as the kitchen, offices, bedrooms or custom furniture and home appliances.

Interior design projects sometimes involve planning entirely new construction, renovating an existing space, or historic renovation which can include adding or elimination of entire walls, designing ceilings, window locations, lighting, technology needs, appliances, and more. Only once the basic structure is finished can the designer begin choosing the right textures, colors, and layout. The interior designer makes the home livable, creating a comfortable environment in which to relax and carry out daily tasks.

Commercial Design:

The commercial design follows the same process. Architects create buildings with a robust infrastructure, ensuring that it meets local building code regulations before the designer can begin with tones, textures, and furnishings. However, the larger spaces sometimes demand a greater responsibility for structural integrity and functionality. Commercial design also requires greater infrastructure needs. These buildings need bathrooms for employees and visitors, elevators for people and heavy freight, parking lots, and cafeterias.

Everywhere you go has been carefully designed and created with a distinct purpose and plan. Further complicating the design plans, designers often also incorporate marketing tactics to influence behavior. For this reason, there are numerous specialization areas associated with commercial design.  Designers specializing in buildings like restaurants, clubs, hospitals, and corporate buildings.

Despite their differences, there is no denying that both interior and hospitality designers are realizing the trends that are taking over. From industrial working-living spaces to hotel design, designers are learning to pull insight from the other side. Home décor has taken on many aspects of hospitality design, and hospitality design is leaning towards making hospitality feel more like home. We’ve come to learn that design should be less about the spaces and more about the clients. Too often, designers define themselves by the types of projects they do, when in fact, designers of interiors all respond to customers various needs and deliver project-specific solutions.